Lutte biologique et écologie spatiale                                                  Biological control and Spatial Ecology
News
june 2014

30/06/2014 Two PhD opportunities are available as part of a new 4-years research project “Modelling and forecasting African Urban Population Patterns for vulnerability and health assessments” (MAUPP). More...

17/06/2014 A map of H7N7 infection risk in Asia
, established with SEEG (Oxford), ILRI and China CDC is published t in Nature Communications. More...

29/05/2014. New maps of global livestock distribution
are published this week in PLoS ONE, in collaboration with ILRI, FAO & Oxford SEEG & ERGO. More...


About the lab

Spatial epidemiology studies the spatial factors determining the emergence, spread and persistence of infectious and vector-borne diseases, invasive species and insect pests, with the aim to identifying important risk factors, map their distribution, and contribute to better prevention, surveillance and control. Over the years, our research has developped over four major axes, detailed below.


Livestock diseases. We have primarily been working on a better understanding of the geography of avian influenza (AI H5N1, H7N9) with particular emphasison the role of agro-ecological factors. Over the years, we have also been involved in research on  other diseases of livestock,  including bovine tuberculosis, foot and mouth disease, bluetongue, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, and Nipah virus infections.  Read more...


Mapping Livestock. The geographical distribution of livestock (cattle, sheep, goat, pig, chicken, duck, buffaloes, camels) is a key driver of the distribution of diseases and  has important environmental impacts at a global scale in terms of direct pollution through manure managment, greenhouse gaz emissions and contribution to antimicrobial resistance. Our work aim to better map the distribution of livestock production at a global scale, with some special emphasis on intensive livestock production and projections. Read more... 


Mapping human population. For many low-income countries of the World where disease burden is greatest, spatially detailed, contemporary census data on human population are missing. As partner of the Worldpop consortiumn, we are working on improving human population distribution maps in Africa and on urban expansion model that would allow us to project how the distribution of human population may change over time. Read more... 


Modelling geographical invasions
Invading organisms spreading though a heterogeneous landscape are difficult to study using conventional statistical models. We aim to develop new methodology to study those type of data, to review existing methods, and to compare all methods in their capacity to detect the influence of landscape heterogeneity on the pattern of spread. Read more...



 
partners

 ILRI FAODLDUOWorldPopERGO
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